Resource Slack: a Theory of Perceived Supply and Demand

We present a general theory of “resource slack,” the degree to which perceived supply of a resource exceeds or falls short of perceived demand. We show how psychological processes that determine perceived slack can explain many phenomena in intertemporal choice and connect decision-making phenomena not previously seen as related.



Citation:

John Lynch, Stephen Spiller, and Gal Zauberman (2015) ,"Resource Slack: a Theory of Perceived Supply and Demand", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 74-79.

Authors

John Lynch, University of Chicago, USA
Stephen Spiller, University of California Los Angeles, USA
Gal Zauberman, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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