Attitudinal Ambivalence: How Is It Stored in Memory?

An important consideration in addressing ambivalence in consumers is how consumers represent ambivalence in their minds. Two studies show that dominant and conflicting reactions to objects are stored together in people's minds. Two additional planned studies investigate whether retrievability and situational irrelevance of conflicting reactions affect felt ambivalence.



Citation:

Amit S. Singh and H. Rao Unnava (2015) ,"Attitudinal Ambivalence: How Is It Stored in Memory? ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 807-807.

Authors

Amit S. Singh, Ohio State University, USA
H. Rao Unnava, Ohio State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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