What’S Next? Anticipated Consumption Variety: Borrowing Affect From the Future to Slow Satiation in the Present

This research investigates the influence of anticipated future consumption variety on consumers’ present consumption satiation. It demonstrates that consumers who anticipate more (vs. less) future variety satiate more slowly. Further, consumers’ negative affect drives the slowed satiation. Product type (vice or virtue) and consumer emotional intelligence moderate this effect.



Citation:

James Mead, Maura L. Scott, and David Hardesty (2015) ,"What’S Next? Anticipated Consumption Variety: Borrowing Affect From the Future to Slow Satiation in the Present", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 147-151.

Authors

James Mead, University of Kentucky, USA
Maura L. Scott, Florida State University, USA
David Hardesty, University of Kentucky, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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