Compensatory Contagion: Social Identity Threat and Celebrity Contagion

This research examines a novel way in which consumers respond to social identity threat. Drawing on fluid compensation theory, we show that people exhibit a preference for objects previously owned by celebrities who are unrelated to a threatened social identity and that this relationship is driven by contagion.



Citation:

Sean T. Hingston and Justin McManus (2015) ,"Compensatory Contagion: Social Identity Threat and Celebrity Contagion", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 557-558.

Authors

Sean T. Hingston, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada
Justin McManus, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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