Meeting in the Middle: Social Influence Effects on the Compromise Effect

We examine the compromise effect in joint dyadic decisions. Results show that the compromise effect emerges in decisions made by male-female and female-female dyads but not in those of male-male dyads. Preliminary evidence suggests that men’s belief that compromising is non-normative for males underlies this effect.



Citation:

Hristina Nikolova and Cait Lamberton (2015) ,"Meeting in the Middle: Social Influence Effects on the Compromise Effect ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 302-307.

Authors

Hristina Nikolova , Boston College, USA
Cait Lamberton , University of Pittsburgh, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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