Competitive Forces When Choosing From Assortments of Varying Size: How Holistic Thinking Mitigates Choice Overload

Researchers disagree whether large assortments increase or decrease satisfaction. By systematically examining and testing the two competing forces (variety effect, overload effect) underlying choice overload effects, we show why inconsistencies might exist. Further, we identify a new moderator – holistic thinking – that mitigates the negative effect of overload feelings on satisfaction.



Citation:

Ilgim Dara and Elizabeth G Miller (2015) ,"Competitive Forces When Choosing From Assortments of Varying Size: How Holistic Thinking Mitigates Choice Overload", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 502-503.

Authors

Ilgim Dara, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA
Elizabeth G Miller, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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