Responses to Humor in Shame-Inducing Health Issue Advertisements With the Effects of Health Worry Levels

Humor effects in shame-inducing health issue advertising is non-existent. Two experimental studies found responses to different levels of humor and shame in health issue prevention messages to be contingent on the individual’s health worry levels. The findings provide implications for theoretical as well as practical contributions.



Citation:

Hye Jin Yoon (2015) ,"Responses to Humor in Shame-Inducing Health Issue Advertisements With the Effects of Health Worry Levels", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 815-815.

Authors

Hye Jin Yoon, Southern Methodist University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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