Shame and Consumption of Counterfeit Products

We investigate the relationship between shame and consumption of counterfeit products to test six hypotheses. Initial results show that there is a significant effect from perceived social risk on shame, and the cost–benefit analysis moderates the relationship between anticipation of shame and purchase intention.



Citation:

Pamela Ribeiro and Delane Botelho (2015) ,"Shame and Consumption of Counterfeit Products", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43, eds. Kristin Diehl , Carolyn Yoon, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 804-804.

Authors

Pamela Ribeiro, EAESP-FGV Brazil
Delane Botelho, EAESP-FGV Brazil



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 43 | 2015



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