When Celebrities Become Brands

Different types of celebrity endorsements lead to different levels of accountability and thus different perceptions from the public. Therefore, in this study, consumer evaluations toward three different types of celebrity endorsements in the absence and presence of celebrity negative information – celebrity-brand, spokesperson, and representer – were studied.



Citation:

HeaKeung Choi, Saraphine Pang, and Sejung Marina Choi (2015) ,"When Celebrities Become Brands", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11, eds. Echo Wen Wan, Meng Zhang, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 320-320.

Authors

HeaKeung Choi, Korea University, Korea
Saraphine Pang, Korea University, Korea
Sejung Marina Choi, Korea University, Korea



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11 | 2015



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