The Reversed Endowment Effect in Living Goods Transaction

Prior research has shown that the endowment effect is sizable and robust. However, the results of four studies suggest that the endowment effect may be reversed in transactions involving living objects, implicating the role of psychological ownership—in particular, perceived accountability and anticipated costs of ownership—in this effect reversal.



Citation:

Rui Chen, Leonard Lee, and Yuhuang Zheng (2015) ,"The Reversed Endowment Effect in Living Goods Transaction", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11, eds. Echo Wen Wan, Meng Zhang, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 320-320.

Authors

Rui Chen, School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University
Leonard Lee, Business School, National University of Singapore
Yuhuang Zheng, School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11 | 2015



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