I Can’T Change Much But We Make a Difference – the Influence of Societal Nostalgic Consumption on Optimism About Future

Four studies differentiate two sources of nostalgic content (collective vs. personal) and show how collective nostalgia colors consumers’ perceptions about their future and thus promotes risking taking decisions in public policy endorsement. We also examine a novel explanation which extends nostalgic from social connectedness to identification with a collective entity.



Citation:

Canice M. C. Kwan, Shirley Y. Y. Cheng, and Alex S. L. Tsang (2015) ,"I Can’T Change Much But We Make a Difference – the Influence of Societal Nostalgic Consumption on Optimism About Future", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11, eds. Echo Wen Wan, Meng Zhang, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 325-325.

Authors

Canice M. C. Kwan, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Shirley Y. Y. Cheng, Hong Kong Baptist University
Alex S. L. Tsang, Hong Kong Baptist University



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11 | 2015



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