When Is More Better and When Is It Worse? Causal Reasoning Drives Preference Between Single and Dual Benefit Products

This research examines the effects of causal structure on preference between dual and single benefit medications. In four studies, participants preferred a dual benefit medication if they believed the symptoms result from the same cause, while preferred the single benefit option if they believe the symptoms result from different causes.



Citation:

kelly Saporta, Shai Danziger, and Steve Sloman (2015) ,"When Is More Better and When Is It Worse? Causal Reasoning Drives Preference Between Single and Dual Benefit Products", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11, eds. Echo Wen Wan, Meng Zhang, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 231-231.

Authors

kelly Saporta, the Open University of Israel, Israel
Shai Danziger, The Faculty of Management, Leon Recanati Graduate School of Business Administration, Tel-Aviv University, Israel.
Steve Sloman, Brown University, USA



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11 | 2015



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