Does It Matter Who Should Be Blamed? Minimizing Customer Aggression When Service Failed

This empirical paper addresses how customer aggression varies as a function of cognitive and emotional arousals after service failure. It extends attribution theory by examining group empowerment and face as moderating effects in negative emotion-aggression relationship. This paper also adds customer skepticism as a mediating effect in attribution-negative emotion relationship.



Citation:

Jun M Luo, Martin J Liu, Ruizhi Yuan, and Natalia Yannopoulou (2015) ,"Does It Matter Who Should Be Blamed? Minimizing Customer Aggression When Service Failed", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11, eds. Echo Wen Wan, Meng Zhang, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 287-188.

Authors

Jun M Luo, Nottingham University Business School China
Martin J Liu, Nottingham University Business School China
Ruizhi Yuan, Nottingham University Business School China
Natalia Yannopoulou, New Castle University Business School



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11 | 2015



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