Implicit Attitude Formation and Change: Relative Impact of Affective Versus Cognitive Processing Modes

Across four studies, we show a differential impact of affective versus cognitive processing modes on the formation of new implicit attitudes, as well as the alteration of old-implicit attitudes. Further, we uncover the existence of a mismatching effect between affective/cognitive processing modes and cognitively/affectively laden implicit attitudes.



Citation:

Anish Nagpal, Juan Jose Muzio Posadas, and Angela Paladino (2015) ,"Implicit Attitude Formation and Change: Relative Impact of Affective Versus Cognitive Processing Modes", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11, eds. Echo Wen Wan, Meng Zhang, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 211-212.

Authors

Anish Nagpal, University of Melbourne, Australia
Juan Jose Muzio Posadas, Villa & Moreno
Angela Paladino, University of Melbourne, Australia



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11 | 2015



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Cultivating Collaboration and Value Cocreation in Consumption Journeys

Melissa Archpru Akaka, University of Denver
Hope Schau, University of Arizona, USA

Read More

Featured

Doing Worse but Feeling Better: Consequences of Collective Choice

Nuno Jose Lopes, University of Navarra
Elena Reutskaja, IESE Business School

Read More

Featured

K12. Use language to change people’s mind: The persuasive power of online marketing communications

Xun He, Katholieke University Leuven, Belgium
Barbara Briers, Vlerick Business School
Luk Warlop, Norwegian School of Management, Norway

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.