What’S Next? Anticipated Consumption Variety: Borrowing Affect From the Future to Slow Satiation in the Present

This research investigates the influence of anticipated future consumption variety on consumers’ present consumption satiation. It demonstrates that consumers who anticipate more (vs. less) future variety satiate more slowly. Further, consumers’ negative affect drives the slowed satiation. Product type (vice or virtue) and consumer emotional intelligence moderate this effect.



Citation:

James Mead, Maura L. Scott, and David Hardesty (2015) ,"What’S Next? Anticipated Consumption Variety: Borrowing Affect From the Future to Slow Satiation in the Present", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11, eds. Echo Wen Wan, Meng Zhang, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 13-16.

Authors

James Mead, University of Kentucky, USA
Maura L. Scott, Florida State University, USA
David Hardesty, University of Kentucky, USA



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11 | 2015



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

The Neutral Face of Blue: How Color Can Make Consumers Stay Sensitive

Sung Hee Wendy Paik, University of Oregon, USA
Jiao Zhang, University of Oregon, USA
Aparna Sundar, University of Oregon, USA

Read More

Featured

The Inimical Lure of Intense Means

Jordan Etkin, Duke University, USA
Szu-chi Huang, Stanford University, USA

Read More

Featured

I5. Take That Mirror Away From me! Clothing Consumption by the Elderly and the Self-identity of the Young

Daniela Ferreira, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.