The Effect of Jargon on Sensitivity to Omissions in Judgment Based on Limited Evidence

Two experiments investigate the positive effect of jargon on sensitivity to omitted information. Ease of processing and perceived credibility can have opposing influences on how people evaluate technical product descriptions. Jargon can also increase sensitivity to missing information. Implications of jargon utilization and omission neglect are discussed.



Citation:

Ruomeng Wu, Esta Shah, and Frank Kardes (2015) ,"The Effect of Jargon on Sensitivity to Omissions in Judgment Based on Limited Evidence", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11, eds. Echo Wen Wan, Meng Zhang, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 283-284.

Authors

Ruomeng Wu, University of Cincinnati, USA
Esta Shah, University of Cincinnati, USA
Frank Kardes, University of Cincinnati, USA



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11 | 2015



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