Blinding Us to the Obvious? the Effect of Statistical Training on the Evaluation of Evidence

The emphasis placed on null hypothesis significance testing in academic training and reporting may lead researchers to interpret evidence dichotomously rather than continuously. We present data showing a substantial majority of researchers across different fields, including consumer research, denies the existence of statistically insignificant evidence.



Citation:

Blakeley McShane and David Gal (2015) ,"Blinding Us to the Obvious? the Effect of Statistical Training on the Evaluation of Evidence", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11, eds. Echo Wen Wan, Meng Zhang, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 202-203.

Authors

Blakeley McShane, Northwestern University, USA
David Gal, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 11 | 2015



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