Using Social Comparisons to Motivate Health Behavior Over the Lifespan: the Impact of Experience With Health Problems

Public health campaigns often use comparisons with worse-off others to motivate health behavior. We show that such downward comparisons in older adults impact prevention-focus and health behavior (healthy snack choice), moderated by experience of their own and of others’ ill health. The effects in mid-life adults were very different.



Citation:

Jane E.J. Ebert and Noelle Nelson (2014) ,"Using Social Comparisons to Motivate Health Behavior Over the Lifespan: the Impact of Experience With Health Problems", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 462-462.

Authors

Jane E.J. Ebert, Brandeis University, USA
Noelle Nelson, The University of Kansas, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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