Risky “Big”Ness: How Conspicuously Signaling Persuades the Self But Dissuades Others

This research argues that conspicuous signals are more effective internally rather than externally. The results of three studies demonstrate that while conspicuously signaling may degrade the perceptions of others, doing so actually enhances the sender’s belief that they embody the trait they are signaling.



Citation:

Daniel Sheehan and Sara Loughran Dommer (2014) ,"Risky “Big”Ness: How Conspicuously Signaling Persuades the Self But Dissuades Others", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 677-680.

Authors

Daniel Sheehan, Georgia Tech, USA
Sara Loughran Dommer, Georgia Tech, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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