How Self-Construal and Social Presence Influence Information Processing

We test and show how the social context moderates the effects of self-construal on information processing. By demonstrating how non-interactive social presence influences the type of processing by individuals with independent and interdependent self-construal, our research advances the literature that examines the effects of self-construal on information processing.



Citation:

Utku Akkoc and Jennifer Argo (2014) ,"How Self-Construal and Social Presence Influence Information Processing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 769-769.

Authors

Utku Akkoc, University of Alberta, Canada
Jennifer Argo, University of Alberta, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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