Facial Feedback Hypothesis Revised: Frequent Smiling Can Reduce Wellbeing

We show the effect of smile-like facial expressions on positive feelings and wellbeing is moderated by consumer's naïve theories regarding why they smile. Smiling increases wellbeing only among consumers led to believe smiling reflects happiness. Among consumers led to believe smiling causes happiness, smiling reduces wellbeing.



Citation:

Aparna Labroo, Anirban Mukhopadhyay , and Ping Dong (2014) ,"Facial Feedback Hypothesis Revised: Frequent Smiling Can Reduce Wellbeing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 96-100.

Authors

Aparna Labroo, Northwestern University, USA
Anirban Mukhopadhyay , Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Ping Dong , University of Toronto, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

F7. Mere Packaging and Consumer Choice

Tim Philipp Doering, University of Michigan, USA
Katherine Burson, University of Michigan, USA
Andrew D Gershoff, University of Texas at Austin, USA

Read More

Featured

The Effect of Future Focus on Self-Control is Moderated by Self-Efficacy

Rafay A Siddiqui, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Jane Park, University of California Riverside, USA
Frank May, Virginia Tech, USA

Read More

Featured

Decisional Conflict Predicts Myopia

Paul Edgar Stillman, Ohio State University, USA
Melissa Ferguson, Cornell University, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.