The Effect of Political Ideology on Reactions to Warning Labels and Consumption Regulations

Three studies demonstrate that when the government is associated with the warning label, conservatives (but not liberals) decrease their intentions to quit smoking, increase their purchase intentions of unhealthy foods, and are more likely to order unhealthy side dishes when drink sizes are restricted by government regulations.



Citation:

Mitchel R. Murdock, Caglar Irmak, and James F. Thrasher (2014) ,"The Effect of Political Ideology on Reactions to Warning Labels and Consumption Regulations ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 59-64.

Authors

Mitchel R. Murdock, University of South Carolina, USA
Caglar Irmak, University of Georgia, USA
James F. Thrasher, University of South Carolina, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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