I Take Therefore I Choose? the Impact of Active Vs. Passive Acquisition on Food Consumption

This research investigates the consequences of actively vs. passively acquiring food items. We demonstrate that active food acquisition generates a false impression of choice, which ultimately lead to increased food consumption. Importantly, the effects are moderated by an individual’s dispositional need-for-control.



Citation:

Rhonda Hadi and Lauren Block (2014) ,"I Take Therefore I Choose? the Impact of Active Vs. Passive Acquisition on Food Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 65-69.

Authors

Rhonda Hadi, Oxford University, UK
Lauren Block, Baruch College, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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