When Food Advertising Triggers Salivation: the Role of Positive Affectivity on Appetitive Craving and Eating Intentions

People with high scores on positive affectivity responded with stronger levels of salivation, appetitive craving and eating intentions when exposed to vivid advertising appeals for pizza. For restrained dieters, compared to non-dieters, the salivation response to vivid cues was highest for those scoring high in positive affectivity.



Citation:

David MOORE and Sara Konrath (2014) ,"When Food Advertising Triggers Salivation: the Role of Positive Affectivity on Appetitive Craving and Eating Intentions ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 615-616.

Authors

David MOORE, University of Michigan, USA
Sara Konrath, University of Michigan, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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