The Avoidance of Moral Obligation

We show that people avoid moral obligation by taking a prosocial option out of their choice set, thereby making it unavailable to them. Furthermore, this occurs whether or not they would have chosen the prosocial option had it been available to them, implying that some avoid being "guilt-tripped.”



Citation:

Stephanie Lin and Rebecca Schaumberg (2014) ,"The Avoidance of Moral Obligation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 797-797.

Authors

Stephanie Lin, Stanford University, USA
Rebecca Schaumberg, New York University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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