Thinking About Scarcity

Recent research on scarcity has focused on how it shifts cognitive capacities (i.e., limiting bandwidth, constraining attention). Here, we describe how scarcity shifts the content of cognition. We show that scarcity changes semantic networks, makes it more difficult to suppress certain thoughts, and naturally draws attention to the scarce resource.



Citation:

Anuj K. Shah, Eldar Shafir, and Sendhil Mullainathan (2014) ,"Thinking About Scarcity", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 215-219.

Authors

Anuj K. Shah, University of Chicago, USA
Eldar Shafir, Princeton University, USA
Sendhil Mullainathan , Harvard Business School, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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