Why Believing in Either More Or Less Willpower Capacity Can Increase Self-Control Performance: a Fluency Perspective

This work demonstrates the flexibility of willpower beliefs from a fluency perspective. Though individuals who believe in an unlimited (versus limited) willpower are more immune to resource depletion, three experiments outline the process and conditions under which believing in a limited (versus unlimited) willpower results in greater self-regulatory performance.



Citation:

Ashley Otto, Joshua Clarkson, Patrick Egan, and Edward Hirt (2014) ,"Why Believing in Either More Or Less Willpower Capacity Can Increase Self-Control Performance: a Fluency Perspective", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 802-802.

Authors

Ashley Otto, University of Cincinnati, USA
Joshua Clarkson, University of Cincinnati, USA
Patrick Egan, Indiana University, USA
Edward Hirt, Indiana University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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