The Urgency Bias

Employing simplified games and real-life consequential choices, we provide evidence for “urgency bias”, showing that people prefer working on urgent (vs. important) tasks that have shorter (vs. longer) completion window however involving smaller (vs. bigger) outcomes, even when task difficulty, goal gradient, outcome scarcity and task interdependence are held constant.



Citation:

Meng Zhu, Yang Yang, and Christopher K. Hsee (2014) ,"The Urgency Bias ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 86-90.

Authors

Meng Zhu, Johns Hopkins University
Yang Yang, Carnegie Mellon University
Christopher K. Hsee, University of Chicago



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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