Discrepancy Between Social Status and Implicit Self-Esteem Prompts Preference For Counterfeit Luxury

The current research explores how perceived social status and implicit self-esteem influence counterfeit luxury consumption. Results of two studies showed a novel effect that a discrepancy between social status and implicit self-esteem led to higher preference for counterfeit luxury products.



Citation:

Miao Hu and Angela Lee (2014) ,"Discrepancy Between Social Status and Implicit Self-Esteem Prompts Preference For Counterfeit Luxury", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 205-209.

Authors

Miao Hu, University of Hawaii, USA
Angela Lee, Northwestern University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Feeling Bad by Wanting More or Wanting More by Feeling Bad: The Materialism - Well-Being Cycle

Esther Doriette Tamara Jaspers, Massey University
Rik Pieters, Tilburg University, The Netherlands

Read More

Featured

J3. You Think I’m Yours but, Trust Me, I’m Not: How Consumers Value Dogs and Cats

Colleen Patricia Kirk, New York Institute of Technology
Samantha Renee Kirk, Boston College, USA

Read More

Featured

Linguistic Antecedents of Anthropomorphism

N. Alican Mecit, HEC Paris, France
tina m. lowrey, HEC Paris, France
L. J. Shrum, HEC Paris, France

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.