What's My Age Again? Subjective Versus Physical Age Feedback Moderates Consumer Health-Related Behavior

How do changes in a consumer’s subjective age influence their health-related behaviors? Giving people feedback that they are subjectively young, as opposed to old, increases their likelihood of engaging in healthy behaviors. Interestingly, this effect does not exist when given feedback that they are physically young, as opposed to old.



Citation:

Daniel Brannon, Chadwick J. Miller, and Adriana Samper (2014) ,"What's My Age Again? Subjective Versus Physical Age Feedback Moderates Consumer Health-Related Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 774-774.

Authors

Daniel Brannon, Arizona State University, USA
Chadwick J. Miller, Arizona State University, USA
Adriana Samper, Arizona State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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