Negative Information and Self-Referencing: Reviving the Sleeper Effect

This research examines the potential for negative information and self-referencing to influence persuasion. It is predicted that the order of positive/negative message presentation and self-referencing impact the sleeper effect. The first experiment supports the significance of ordering, and the second suggests the importance of further research of self structures.



Citation:

Adrienne Foos, Kathleen Keeling, and Debbie Isobel Keeling (2014) ,"Negative Information and Self-Referencing: Reviving the Sleeper Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 784-784.

Authors

Adrienne Foos, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Kathleen Keeling, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Debbie Isobel Keeling, Loughboroug University, United Kingdom



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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