Picturing Time: How Taking Photos Affects Time Perception and Memory

While people take pictures to hold onto times in their lives, we show that taking pictures actually speeds up subjective experiences of time, making time seem to fly. Further, taking pictures leads people to feel they remember the experience better; however, taking picture actually decreases how much one remembers long-term.



Citation:

Alix Barasch, Kristin Diehl, and Gal Zauberman (2014) ,"Picturing Time: How Taking Photos Affects Time Perception and Memory ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 81-85.

Authors

Alix Barasch, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Kristin Diehl, University of Southern California, USA
Gal Zauberman, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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