The Embodied Psychology of Time Limits: How Unrelated Motion States Shape Intentions to Act By a Deadline

Across four experiments, we found that participants who imagined or actually enacted movements (e.g. walking/running) indicated a stronger intention to act (e.g. attend a sale or receive a vaccine) by a well-defined deadline than did people in static positions (e.g. standing). As expected, perceived ability mediated the combined effects.



Citation:

Duo Jiang and Dolores Albarracín (2014) ,"The Embodied Psychology of Time Limits: How Unrelated Motion States Shape Intentions to Act By a Deadline", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 531-532.

Authors

Duo Jiang, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Dolores Albarracín, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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