Can Broken Hearts Lead to an Endangered Planet? Social Exclusion Reduces Willingness to “Go Green”

Four experiments suggest that social exclusion – a prevalent experience in consumer life – reduces willingness to engage in pro-environmental consumption. Social exclusion (vs. acceptance) rendered people less willing to make self-sacrifices for the sake of the environment through reduced empathy. Framing pro-environmental consumption in socially beneficial terms eliminated that detrimental effect.



Citation:

Iman Naderi and Nicole Mead (2014) ,"Can Broken Hearts Lead to an Endangered Planet? Social Exclusion Reduces Willingness to “Go Green”", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 91-95.

Authors

Iman Naderi, Fairfield University, USA
Nicole Mead, Erasmus University, the Netherlands



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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