Consumer Misinformation: the Anti-Consumption of Green Products

This study contributes to an understanding of how consumer misinformation can encourage the anti-consumption of some green products. Multiple methods were used to gather data, with the intention of bringing multiple points of view to the emerging misinformation surrounding the consumption of E10 fuel.



Citation:

Pepukayi Chitakunye, Fanny Saruchera, Maxwell Phiri, Amandeep Takhar-Lail, and Evelyn Derera (2014) ,"Consumer Misinformation: the Anti-Consumption of Green Products", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 777-777.

Authors

Pepukayi Chitakunye, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa
Fanny Saruchera, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Maxwell Phiri, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Amandeep Takhar-Lail, University of Bedfordshire, United Kingdom
Evelyn Derera, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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