Would Materialists Buy a Counterfeit Even When Most People Know It Is Not Legit?

This study demonstrates that high-materialism individuals are more inclined to acquire a counterfeit when most people cannot identify it as fake versus when half of people would not identify it as fake. However, this finding is obtained with inconspicuous items (e.g. perfumes), but not with conspicuous ones (e.g. bags).



Citation:

Marcelo Vinhal Nepomuceno (2014) ,"Would Materialists Buy a Counterfeit Even When Most People Know It Is Not Legit? ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 801-801.

Authors

Marcelo Vinhal Nepomuceno, ESCP Europe, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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