“And” Bridges, “With” Bonds: a Lexical Inferencing-Based Framework For Influencing Perceptions of Product Combinations

Subtle differences in language can influence consumer preferences. We examine the difference between using the conjunctions “and” versus “with” in product combinations. “With” is superior than “and” for combinations that contain products for which integration is clearly important, and processing style helps explain responses to subtle language cues.



Citation:

Vanessa Patrick and Kelly L. Haws (2014) ,"“And” Bridges, “With” Bonds: a Lexical Inferencing-Based Framework For Influencing Perceptions of Product Combinations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 136-140.

Authors

Vanessa Patrick, University of Houston, USA
Kelly L. Haws, Vanderbilt University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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