The Effects of an Emergency Reserve on Self-Control Performance

The presence of an emergency reserve in a mental budget can improve self-control by providing appropriate balance between indulgent flexibility and stringent goals. Reserves appear to work by reducing depletion and increasing task motivation. However, this effect is eliminated if initial budgets are too deprived.



Citation:

Marissa Sharif and Suzanne Shu (2014) ,"The Effects of an Emergency Reserve on Self-Control Performance", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 151-155.

Authors

Marissa Sharif, University of California Los Angeles, USA
Suzanne Shu, University of California Los Angeles, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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