A Recipe For Friendship: Similarity in Food Consumption Promotes Affiliation and Trust

We find similar food consumption creates friendship and increases trust through shared experience. Friends eat more similarly than strangers and observers perceive people eating similarly are friends (studies 1-2). Shared food experience connects strangers consuming similarly (studies 3-4). Subsequently, strangers consuming similarly trust and cooperate more when negotiating (study 5).



Citation:

Kaitlin Woolley and Ayelet Fishbach (2014) ,"A Recipe For Friendship: Similarity in Food Consumption Promotes Affiliation and Trust", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 736-736.

Authors

Kaitlin Woolley, University of Chicago, USA
Ayelet Fishbach, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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