Inferences on Negative Labels and the Horns Effect

Three studies demonstrate that the horns effect (i.e., a negative halo) influences product inferences associated with negative labels. Moreover, this effect is amplified by consumers low in critical thinking and attenuated by consumers who engage in diagnostic reasoning. These findings collectively demonstrate the bias of negative labels on consumer inferences and subsequent judgments. Taken together, this research identifies an important moderator to the halo effect.



Citation:

Aparna Sundar, Frank Kardes, and Theodore Noseworthy (2014) ,"Inferences on Negative Labels and the Horns Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 377-380.

Authors

Aparna Sundar, Virginia Tech
Frank Kardes, University of Cincinnati
Theodore Noseworthy, York University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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