Prosocial Incentives in the Field

Recent research indicates prosocial incentives may be more effective than standard incentives; however, other work suggests individuals may avoid such situations if possible. We test the effectiveness of prosocial incentives in the field, and show that they increase effort, encourage participation, and are more effective in public versus private settings.



Citation:

Elizabeth Keenan, Alex Imas, and Ayelet Gneezy (2014) ,"Prosocial Incentives in the Field", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 12-16.

Authors

Elizabeth Keenan, University of California San Diego, USA
Alex Imas, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Ayelet Gneezy, University of California San Diego, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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