Don’T I Know You? Self-Disclosure Increases As Nearness in Proximity Becomes Salient

We propose that increased salience of physical proximity activates concepts related to close interpersonal relationships and increases disclosure of sensitive information. This effect is driven by cues for physical distance which impact disclosure rates because cues for distance act as a conceptual metaphor that activate constructs related to interpersonal relationships.



Citation:

Paul Connell, Stacey Finkelstein, and Lauren Mayor (2014) ,"Don’T I Know You? Self-Disclosure Increases As Nearness in Proximity Becomes Salient ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 779-779.

Authors

Paul Connell, SUNY Stony Brook, USA
Stacey Finkelstein, Baruch College, USA
Lauren Mayor, Baruch College, CUNY Graduate Center, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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