Did You Bring Enough For Everybody? How Differences in Anticipated and Actual Reciprocity Lead to Over-Contribution in Sharing Contexts

This paper examines sharing contexts in which group members contribute to, and draw from, a pool of resources. Three studies on food choices indicate that consumers tend to over-contribute in such contexts due to a failure to consider the amount they will take from others at the time of consumption.



Citation:

Jeffrey Parker, Nita Umashankar, and Martin Schleicher (2014) ,"Did You Bring Enough For Everybody? How Differences in Anticipated and Actual Reciprocity Lead to Over-Contribution in Sharing Contexts", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42, eds. June Cotte, Stacy Wood, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 635-635.

Authors

Jeffrey Parker, Georgia State University, USA
Nita Umashankar, Georgia State University, USA
Martin Schleicher, IAE Business School, AR



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 42 | 2014



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