Cross-Cultural Differences in the Regulation of Negative Specific Emotions

Motivated to feel good, people tend to engage in behavior that may decrease or eliminate negative emotions (i.e., emotion regulation). We propose that individualists (vs. collectivists) are more likely to regulate ego-focused negative emotions (e.g., frustration) versus other-focused emotions (e.g., shame). One study demonstrates this effect. Additional studies are proposed.



Citation:

Hagar Tubis and Hila Riemer (2014) ,"Cross-Cultural Differences in the Regulation of Negative Specific Emotions", in LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 3, eds. Eva M. González, Tina M. Lowrey, and , Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 78-78.

Authors

Hagar Tubis, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev ,Israel
Hila Riemer, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev ,Israel



Volume

LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 3 | 2014



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