The Illusion of Lie Effect: the Suspicious Fluency of Round Numbers

Round numbers (i.e., multiples of 5) are used often in communications, rendering them highly fluent. However, when used to quantify random events or unfamiliar claims they are distrusted, an effect termed "the illusion of lie." Product claims made in infomercials or comparative advertising are distrusted more if employing round numbers.



Citation:

Claudiu Dimofte and Chris Janiszewski (2013) ,"The Illusion of Lie Effect: the Suspicious Fluency of Round Numbers ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Claudiu Dimofte, San Diego State, USA
Chris Janiszewski, University of Florida, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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