Mental Stealing Effects on Purchase Decisions For Others

Establishing mental accounts for others can foster concerns about stealing from that account, an act we label mental stealing. Three experiments demonstrate mental stealing concerns decrease purchase intentions towards products priced significantly below the account, and that this effect is mediated by consumer guilt. Implications for mental accounting are discussed.



Citation:

Esta Denton and Derek D. Rucker (2013) ,"Mental Stealing Effects on Purchase Decisions For Others", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Esta Denton, Northwestern University, USA
Derek D. Rucker, Northwestern University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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