Loneliness and Moral Judgment (Does Loneliness Make Moral Judgment More Permissible?)

This paper examines how loneliness influences people’s moral judgment. This paper shows that lonely people make moral judgment more permissible. Four studies demonstrate that lonely people are more likely to make a moral utilitarian choice than non-lonely people (study 1 and study 2); and lonely people rate five dimensions of moral foundations (harm, fairness, in-group, authority and purity) (Haidt 2001) less relevant to their judgment than non-lonely people (studies 3 and 4). We also document that the effects are driven by empathetic concern.



Citation:

Jenny (Jinfeng) Jiao and Jing (Alice) Wang (2013) ,"Loneliness and Moral Judgment (Does Loneliness Make Moral Judgment More Permissible?)", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Jenny (Jinfeng) Jiao, University of Iowa, USA
Jing (Alice) Wang, University of Iowa, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

N5. Mixed Feelings, Mixed Baskets: How Emotions of Pride and Guilt Drive the Relative Healthiness of Sequential Food Choices

Julia Storch, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Koert van Ittersum, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Jing Wan, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Read More

Featured

Morality Matters in the Marketplace: The Influence of Morally Based Attitudes on Consumer Purchase Intentions

Andrew Luttrell, Ball State University
Jacob Teeny, Ohio State University, USA
Richard Petty, Ohio State University, USA

Read More

Featured

Can Fear Be Eaten? Emotional and Behavioral Consequences of Intake of Fear-inducing Food or Drink

Jiangang Du, Nankai University
Qiuying Zheng, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine
Michael K. Hui, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
Xiucheng Fan, Fudan University, China

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.