Single Option Aversion

Single option aversion is a context effect whereby consumers are unwilling to choose an attractive option when no competing options are included in the choice set. Consequently, an option may be chosen more often when competing options are added. This effect has unique practical and theoretical implications for consumer search.



Citation:

Daniel Mochon (2013) ,"Single Option Aversion", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Daniel Mochon, Tulane University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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