Green Confessions: the Moderating Influence of Religiosity on Pro-Environmental Compensatory Consumption

‘Green guilt’ may arise after reflecting about one’s transgressions toward the environment, thus motivating restorative consumption behaviors. In two studies, we find that private green confessions may boost initial compensatory behaviors but both public and private confessions reduce green compensatory consumption across multiple tasks, especially for intrinsically religious individuals.



Citation:

Daniele Mathras, Naomi Mandel, and Adam B. Cohen (2013) ,"Green Confessions: the Moderating Influence of Religiosity on Pro-Environmental Compensatory Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Daniele Mathras, Arizona State University, USA
Naomi Mandel, Arizona State University, USA
Adam B. Cohen, Arizona State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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