How Suspicion Can Lead to Suboptimal Consumer Choices

This paper shows that suspicion affects subsequent, unrelated consumer choices. Contrary to its effect on related choices, suspicion renders unrelated choices suboptimal, leading suspicious consumers to choose more vices over virtues than their non-suspicious counterparts. Cognitive load explains these counter-intuitive findings.



Citation:

Julie Verstraeten, Tina Tessitore, and Maggie Geuens (2013) ,"How Suspicion Can Lead to Suboptimal Consumer Choices", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Julie Verstraeten, Ghent University, Belgium
Tina Tessitore, Ghent University, Belgium
Maggie Geuens, Ghent University, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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